PSG Workshop Offers Interview Practice and Tips 

PSG recently held another workshop for job candidates. PSG managers Nicole Cassista, Katie Chisolm, Kristen Coppins, Brian Donovan and Rachel Frisbee presented tips and best practices for successful interviews and conducted mock interviews with each candidate.

 

Among the tips that managers shared were these Do’s and Dont’s:

 

Do: Prepare, prepare, prepare

Do: Conduct research

Do: Role play/practice

Do: Be honest/humble

Do: Stay positive

Do: Provide specific examples

Do: Be concise

Don’t: Focus on growth

Don’t: Discuss compensation

Don’t: Inflate skills (ie. Excel “expert”)

Don’t: Only ask questions about the company

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PSG Holds Workshop on Resume Best Practices

Earlier this month, PSG held a workshop for job candidates to discuss resume best practices. PSG managers Kristen Coppins, Katie Chisolm and Elizabeth Siracusa offered information about resume content, formatting and presentation and discussed questions and challenges that candidates have when it comes to their resumes. The session also included one-on-one resume reviews and critiques.

 

The three biggest takeaways from this workshop were:

–          It is ok to have multiple versions of your resume

–          When reviewing resumes, employers spend 60 seconds or less deciding whether they are interested in the candidate

–         Your resume MUST be visually appealing with a layout that is easy on the eye and stands out

 

PSG regularly holds workshops for job candidates, as part of its commitment to being a resource for job seekers and helping them find employment.

5 Myths About Temporary Work

When you meet hundreds of job candidates each week, you hear a lot of comments and learn about candidates’ hopes and fears about their careers. Sometimes we hear statements that aren’t 100% accurate or are based on outdated stereotypes. PSG President Aaron Green wrote this article, published on Boston.com, to debunk the myths about temporary jobs.

 

 

LinkedIn Sued for Revealing Job Seekers’ “References”

Many job seekers turn to LinkedIn to expand their network and create a digital profile to share with recruiters and employers. Many LinkedIn users also spend time soliciting references and recommendations to bolster their profiles. What they may not realize is that recruiters and employers can use LinkedIn to create a secret reference list and conduct “back door” reference checks, too.

 

Not every recruiter or employer does this, of course, but those who do can use the LinkedIn “Reference Search” function to generate a list of people in their own network who worked at the same company at the same time as a job candidate. The recruiter or employer can then contact people on the list, without notifying the job candidate. The function is only available to LinkedIn premium account holders.

 

Now, four workers are suing LinkedIn and contending that the Reference Search function has cost them job opportunities. They are charging that LinkedIn, in providing the job reference material, enabled potential employers to “anonymously dig into the employment history of any LinkedIn member, and make hiring and firing decisions based upon the information they gather,” without ensuring that the information was accurate and, therefore, in violation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

 

Read more here.

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Finding ‘Hot Pockets’ in Today’s Job Market

While the general unemployment rate may remains relatively high, for professionals and those with a college degree, the unemployment rate is closer to three percent. Employers have increased demand for qualified candidates in certain sectors, including Financial Services, Human Resources, IT and some entry-level positions.

PSG’s President Aaron Green recently shared his thoughts with Boston.com about what makes some industries and jobs ‘hot.’

Read the full article here.

The Best Time to Look for a Job

Job seekers stymied by the ‘summer slow-down’ can take heart: your in-box will start buzzing again soon.

PSG’s President Aaron Green recently shared his thoughts with Boston.com about the best and worst job-seeking ‘seasons.’  However, while some periods may be slower than others in some industries or at some firms, Green advises that the best time to look for a job is “when you need one.”

Read the full article here.

Inside PSG – Frank’s Story

Are you an experienced recruiter or manager looking for your next challenge?

 

If so, hear why Frank Gentile thinks PSG is a great place to work.

 

 

“Teamwork is paramount here at PSG.”

 

“If you are an industry leader and want to work for an organization that fosters teamwork, staff development and has a strong company culture – we want to speak to you!”

 

-Frank Gentile, Director at PSG

Ask A Recruiter: Negotiating Salary

Q: What tips do you have for negotiating salary?

A: This is a good question, because there are lots of factors to consider when it comes to salary negotiations.

My first recommendation when considering salary negotiation is to do research so you understand the market and how you and your salary, or salary offer, fit in it. Salary.com is a good place to start to get a base salary range relevant to your position and experience, but then you have to consider the employer’s situation, the job market (demand) for that position and the economy overall in your area. If you are interviewing for a new job, the salary you are offered is based on these things, as well as how your interview goes and whether or not you are currently employed and, if so, what you’re currently making, as well as how your experience and education compares to current employees and their compensation within the organization. The employer will make you a salary offer based on all of these factors. They may make another candidate a different salary offer for the same position.

Understanding the situation is important so that you go into the negotiation (or not) with the right expectations. In my work, it’s common to see candidates whose expectations are out-of-line get stuck without a job because they don’t get offers or turn them down because they are below their out-of-line expectations.

Once you have vetted your expectations, here are a few ‘do’s and don’ts’:

Do:

Understand what you’re worth – Understanding your value will help you enter negotiations with a realistic outlook. A recruiter can help you understand what salary range is appropriate for your industry and experience levels.

‘Monetize’ your skills – Where it’s appropriate, frame your work in terms that show real monetary value. For example, customer support skills can be framed in terms of how much time or money was saved by resolving issues faster.

Remember why you’re doing this – Think about why you want the job and what it is that you’re looking for. It shouldn’t only be about the money. Even if that’s an important factor, keeping the other reasons in mind will help you focus on the big picture.

Don’t:

Don’t mention money too early – Let the employer bring up the subject first. If you ask about salary too early in the process, it will seem as though this is your primary interest. Focus on getting the offer first! Some interviewers bring the topic up early to use it as a screening tool. In that case, you can respond with an honest answer about what you’re currently earning and what your hopes are, but you should also stress how important it is to you to find a rewarding job.

Don’t ignore other parts of the compensation package – Salary is only part of an offer; it’s important to consider the whole package and the other benefits being offered, such as healthcare insurance, retirement investment programs, tuition reimbursement, etc. as well as other aspects of the work like the size, culture and reputation of the organization, the commute and more.

Don’t lose track of the big picture – When candidates become too focused on one particular aspect of the job search – getting a raise of a certain percentage, being offered a certain job title – they run the risk of missing out on opportunities that might be right for them.

About the Recruiter
ImageFrank Gentile is a 20+ year veteran of the staffing industry and an experienced recruiter. As a Director at Professional Staffing Group (PSG) Frank oversees the permanent placement division. 

 

 

2014 Forecast for Boston Jobs

By Frank Gentile

2014 looks to be a good year for job growth; it might even be the best that Boston has seen since before the recession.  All of the surveys – including those of employers, hiring managers and job seekers – are pointing up, and most companies will tell you they have plans to hire in the New Year.

This means we’ll likely see a shift toward an employee-driven job market (away from an employer-driven market) in which candidates may receive multiple job offers and employers have a more difficult time with retention and with finding candidates who qualified for their open positions.

Beginning in 2014, here are some trends I forecast we’ll start seeing:

Companies will get creative in their efforts to attract employees – With a tighter labor pool to select from, we’ll start to see companies get more aggressive in attracting candidates. The last time this happened, with the tech sector in the late 90’s, we saw employers highlight workplace perks like foosball tables and bring-your-pet-to-work policies. Similarly, I believe we’ll see an increase in sign-on bonuses and perhaps stock plan offers to attract highly-skilled workers.

Health insurance benefits will feature more prominently in job offers – The Affordable Care Act has changed the healthcare options for numerous workers and helped emphasize healthcare plans overall. For employers with premium benefits, expect to start seeing job offers that specifically highlight healthcare benefits.

Baby Boomers will finally retire – The first Baby Boomers turned 62 in 2008, making them eligible to claim retirement benefits. However, the U.S. economy took a nosedive that same year and prompted many Boomers to stay in the workplace. Now that they’re eligible for full retirement benefits and the economy has stabilized and is starting to improve, we’ll see a lot more workers from this generation begin to retire. This will open up jobs at the managerial level and, as companies train younger workers for these roles, it will create opportunities at lower levels too. Employers will need to add employees to fill the subsequent gaps in the workplace.

Employers will enhance workforce diversity plans – There are many reasons to hire diverse workers, and now one of the most pressing is the need to find and retain quality employees. Faced with a shortage of qualified job applicants, employers will need to tap into new pools of skilled candidates. Organizations that have effective plans for attracting a diverse workforce will be at a competitive advantage. Recruiters will target passive candidates –In 2014 recruiters will have no choice but to look for passive candidates, i.e. candidates who aren’t actively seeking a new job. This means using social networks like LinkedIn and industry associations and organizations to search for and communicate with prospects.

Informational interviews will increase – Companies are starting to spend more time with informational interview candidates and on exploratory meetings, in order to develop a network and candidate pool. Some firms will hire top workers even if they don’t have a specific position available for that worker.

frank-gentile-2Frank Gentile is a 20+ year veteran of the staffing industry and an experienced recruiter. As a Director at Professional Staffing Group (PSG) Frank oversees the permanent placement division.  

Tips for Interviewing for a Temporary Job

BostonHerald.com recently published this article on how to interview for a temporary job. Naturally, we agree with the writer that temporary positions can be terrific career opportunities and that it’s important to prepare properly for them.

For more advice on how to ace an interview, see our previous posts on preparing for an interview; researching a company before an interview; questions to ask during an interview; appropriate office attire for interviews, following up after an interview; and protocol for thank you notes.