3 step formula for resume ‘bullet-points’

3 step formula for resume ‘bullet-points’

Taking “Best Practices” and making them “How-To’s”

Hi everyone,

In our effort to continue providing concrete ‘how-to’ content vs. just ‘best-practice’ content, we wanted to further explore tips for writing a resume.

While writing this post, I kept finding myself reaching back to a LinkedIn article from 2014 by Laszlo Bock (former SVP of people operations at Google) and I realized that I’m not going to say this better than Laszlo already has

We all know that ‘bullet-points’ on the resume are really important, but if you’re still listing out responsibilities and using a thesaurus (do they still exist?) to dress it up, please click the link below, it’s worth the 10 minute read.

Laszlo did a terrific job breaking down the resume to a tangible ‘how-to’ using the formula:

Accomplished [X] as measured by [Y] by doing [Z] (click to link to the article!!)

If you’ve read the article and still need help taking your resume to the next level applying this formula – please send me an e-mail, I’d be more than happy to walk through this tailored to your specific resume (jpickering@psgstaffing.com)

Job Search Resources: How Many is Too Many?

Job Search Resources:  How Many is Too Many?

Taking “Best Practices” and making them “How-To’s”

Answer: There’s no such thing as too many resources for a job search! (ok, maybe 50+ is too many, but hear me out)

My goal with this post is to help provide a Check-List of Job Search Resources and let you experiment with each one to figure out what works best for you. I’m not here to declare which resource is better than the other because in the real world, it’s completely dependent on the person and their specific situation.

Depending on who you ask, everyone has a different “go-to” resource for the job search (probably on the list below) and each person swears by their method as the only way to find a job. I’m not a believer in a one-resource-fits-all model which is why I strongly recommend trying each resource, even if on a small scale, for the most effective results.

I’ve also included at least 1 quick tip for each resource, but I’d love to do a more thorough action plan if you want to talk more. Shoot me a quick email (jpickering@psgstaffing.com) or give me a call (617 250 1078) and who knows… if people want to see it, I can even write more detailed posts for each of the listed resources below.

Here’s the check-list based on the most popular suggestions I’ve heard from both active and passive job-seekers over the past year:

  1. Networking – Quick Tip: Make a list of family, friends, classmates, old colleagues, alumni, etc. and send at least 10 e-mails or make 10 phone calls a day working down the list asking for help
  2. Referral from someone at the company – Quick Tip: Use LinkedIn to target someone you know at the company you want to work for and have them to submit your resume on your behalf
  3. Referral from someone outside the company – Quick Tip: If you aren’t connected to anyone directly at the company, find someone who works there that is connected to someone in your LinkedIn network and ask for an email introduction
  4. Job boards (post your resume) – Quick Tip: if you’re worried about unwanted emails, set up an email account specifically for your job search where all resume inquiries can go
  5. Job boards (apply to ads) – Quick Tip: Don’t just use the major job boards (Indeed, ZipRecruiter, Monster, Glassdoor, etc.) Use the specialized sites too like Higheredjobs.com, idealist.org, or Dice.com
  6. Corporate websites – Quick Tip: Take advantage of instant connection opportunities like Live Chat and Messenger apps for companies on the cutting edge of hiring
  7. Staffing agencies – Quick Tip: Don’t partner with just one; sign on with multiple recruiters to maximize your exposure to new opportunities.
  8. Social media – Quick Tip: If you’re interested in start-up’s or Tech-savvy companies, check out classic social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and even Snap Chat where new jobs are posted.

PS – Have another great way to find a job that didn’t crack our list? I want to hear about it! Leave the suggestion in the comments or contact me directly with the feedback

Happy Searching!!

5 ways to get your resume to 1 page

5 ways to get your resume to 1 page

Taking “Best Practices” and making them “How-To’s”

If you’ve heard it once, you’ve heard it a hundred times – “your resume should be 1 page!” The problem is; that’s where the advice ends. Everyone seems to agree that a resume should stick to 1 page, but an actual guideline for what to edit is still missing

Here are 5 tips as part of our “1 page resume guideline” that will take you from knowing your resume needs to be shorter to actually making your resume shorter.

  1. How big is the font? If the answer isn’t 10, make this change now… font size ’10’. If you’re already ahead on this one, take it down to 9.5. It might seem like a small concession but in reality it could save you 2-3 lines of valuable space.
  1. Do you have an objective or summary at the top? I get it, it can be tough to tell your story through a resume, but using an objective or summary is a DOUBLE NEGATIVE! Not only does it take up prime resume space, but you’re also holding yourself to a specific position or background. It can box you in and land in the dreaded “no” pile
  1. Save the Personal Interests for Social Media! You’d be shocked how many resumes include a section at the bottom of personal interests. I’m all for building a relationship and getting to know a person, but the bottom of a resume isn’t the time or the place.
  1. Stop equally dividing bullet points under each job! Your most recent position should have 5-8 accomplishment-based bullet points. That doesn’t mean all the jobs on the resume deserve the same real-estate. The further back the job in your career, the fewer bullet points it should have describing your accomplishments (2-3 tops). The more jobs you have, the less space you’ll have for bullets so make sure to save the majority for your most recent positions.
  1. Spacing, spacing, spacing. There are so many little ways to save a line here, or a line there on a resume that can really make a difference. Here are a few quick hacks:
    1. For Contact Info, put your email and phone # on the same line (instead of 2)
    2. For Skills, list them on one line using commas instead of multiple lines with bullet points
    3. Instead of double spacing between sections, try single spacing after inserting a “line break”
    4. Leave off employment from pre-graduation / non-relevant experience to the job

 Tried all 5 tips and still over a page? Here are a few more hints…

  • Put your best foot forward (lead with your strengths on top)
  • If it’s not relevant to the job you’re applying to… leave it off!
  • Assess each line of the resume looking for “wasted space”

I’d love to connect about this if you’re still having trouble or want to share feedback. Here are the best ways to get a hold of me and I promise you’ll hear back within 24 hours!!

  • Send me an email (jpickering@psgstaffing.com)
  • Give me a call 617-250-1078 (that’s my direct line)
  • Or, if you happen to be on our website, chat in and tell the operator you’re looking for me and 1 page resume advice. They will help us connect!